Archive for November, 2016

All About Glass Tile

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Tile

Glass tile is a versatile material that can be used in many ways. It can be used in small amounts, such as a backsplash, or it can be used on a larger scale and cover the entire wall or floor! This material can be mixed with different materials to make a unique look. If you desire a dressy look, glass tiles may be your answer.

There are many sizes and styles in which glass tiles are available. The most popular size is 1”x1” square tiles, however many other options are available. The largest size that can be ordered is 12”x12”; with various smaller sizes available. Glass tile are also available in pebbles and interlocking rectangular styles. This material can be used in endless configurations. Molding and chair rail glass tiles are also available. Visit one of our showrooms to get a closer look at the many options glass tile has to offer. Forget any pre-conceived notions you may have about this material. It is much more versatile than you may think!

Our Virtual Room Designer lets you experiment with different sizes, colors and styles of glass tiles. Get a better idea of how the material will look in a space. This online tool is easy to use, and you can even upload real photos of the space you want to change. All you have to do is choose a room photo to upload. Once we receive it, we transfer it into the software and email you the file. This allows you to try different sizes and finishes in your very own space!

Glass tiles are available in different finishes and opacities. Solid clear glass tiles are perfect for light and bright spaces. Shiny and iridescent glass tiles are good at adding drama and glitz. Matte finish tiles can be used in rustic or contemporary spaces. No matter your interior styling, there is a glass tile option right for you. Visit one of our showrooms today!

Can I Use Marble in a Steam Shower?

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Kitchen and Bath

Steam showers are a popular way to relax at the end of the day. And with those dramatic glass doors framing the shower area, it’s common to want to install something dramatic and beautiful on the walls of the shower as well. And while there are a number of different materials that work well in steam showers from porcelain to glass, marble and other natural stones should be avoided in this area whenever possible.

Porous Stone

Marble is a natural, metamorphic stone made up primarily of calcite. The stone is porous, and can therefore absorb moisture if it comes in contact with it. Because steam is just hot water vapor, it can easily penetrate the many pores on your marble.

At best, this can cause a temporary darkening of the stone as it absorbs the water, then dries out again returning to normal. Unfortunately, however, your water may contain other minerals and substances that over time could build up in and stain your stone, discoloring it.

Some stones also contain minerals and elements that react poorly with moisture over time. Bianco Carrara, for example, a popular white and gray stone, contains iron. In a steam shower, your white marble may begin to rust over time. Green marble, another popular type of stone, contains the mineral serpentine, which causes the marble to spall or to flake when it gets wet, ruining the surface texture of the stone.

Sealing the Stone

Most natural stone used in a shower area should be sealed with a silicone-based impregnating sealer against the moisture. And while this would certainly help in a steam shower, there are still some issues:

  • The sealer does break down over time, sometimes unevenly so you could never be sure your stone was 100% protected
  • The sealer can be unevenly applied, leaving to small gaps in the stone
  • Moisture can penetrate the stone through the grout joints, which can lead to similar problems as if the stone were not sealed at all

So while marble is a beautiful addition to many bathrooms, avoid using it in a steam shower and use a non-porous material instead.

Happy Veteran’s Day!

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Holidays

Today and every day we want to thank all the brave men and women who sacrifice so much; and risk their lives fighting for our safety and freedom! We will always remember and honor our veterans! 

Transitional Style Interior Design

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Design and Decorating

Many people are familiar with traditional and contemporary types of interior design. You may also be familiar with some of the sub-sets of both of these groups such as Country or Post Modern. One of the most frequently used – and yet seldom mentioned – types of design, however, isn’t any one of these. It’s transitional design, and as people learn more about various other design styles, transitional is the design theme that seems to take place the most often.

What Is Transitional Style Interior Design?

Transitional style is a blend of traditional and modern design styles. It combines several elements of both designs fluidly into one, cohesive design that doesn’t fit entirely into one or the other group.
A home with a transitional design style may mix things like contemporary furniture with lots of more traditional prints on draperies or throw pillows. Or you may have very formal or traditional furnishings, but your prints, artwork, flooring, wall colors, and textiles are all more contemporary in design.

Transitional design often sounds like it’s going to be a disaster, combining elements from extremely different eras and styles into one room, but this is one of the most frequently used designs for a reason; it works effortlessly in nearly every home.

Achieving Transitional Design

Transitional design is very easy to pull together. This is because you can be more relaxed with what you use. As long as you have some central element that pulls everything together, such as a color palette, you can use nearly anything you want within the room.

This is in direct contrast to purely contemporary or traditional design, which insists that you use only pieces, colors, and designs from within the movement you are working from. This can actually be fairly limiting, and can also be time consuming and expensive to achieve.

Unlike Country design, however, which is more of a mixture of different patterns and designs, transitional design can include a lot of modern elements without having them look out of place in the room, such as electronics and their display and storage.

So when you’re trying to put a name to the effortless design you’ve achieved in your own home, consider using transitional design to describe it.

Domestic vs Exotic Hardwood

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Hardwood and Laminate

There are a lot of decisions to be made when selecting hardwood for your floor. Do you want a natural finish or a stain? What about solid or engineered construction? Are you going to purchase pre-finished floor boards or have your installer finish them after installation? Included in all of these choices and decisions is whether to use a domestic hardwood, or an exotic one. While the name “exotic” implies something very different, unusual, or foreign, in this case it merely refers to any hardwood not harvested in the US. You have a lot of different wood species to choose from regardless of which category you pick, but having some information about the two basic groupings can help you make your decision.

Domestic Hardwood

You’re probably the most familiar with domestic hardwoods. Red and white oak, maple, hickory, birch, beech, elm, pine, and cherry are all domestic hardwoods. They vary tremendously in color, grain pattern, and in hardness, but because they have been in use in the US for so many years, they often give an appearance of tradition to a home. For example, wide pine planks are often used in farmhouses, while maple is most often seen on basketball courts and dance studios.

Far and away the most popular domestic hardwood is red oak. It has a warm, creamy tone that ranges from pink to red with lots of gold mixed in. The grain is even and consistent, like most domestic hardwoods, excepting hickory, and it’s a fairly hard and durable wood.

Hickory is the hardest and most dramatic domestic wood, but even this is still fairly consistent in grain and color – in other words, you know what to expect from lot to lot.

Exotic Hardwood

Exotic hardwoods are often much harder and more durable than domestic. Brazilian cherry, for example, is much harder and richer in color than American cherry. Brazilian walnut is also much harder than American walnut.

Exotic hardwoods are also often very dramatic in their coloring and grain pattern. These hardwoods are meant to be noticed. They are often more costly than domestic woods, because of the cost of shipping, but this cost is often offset by the dramatic color and rich veining they posses.

If you want a traditional looking wood floor that will be the backdrop to the rest of your décor – opt for domestic. For those that want the floor to become the centerpiece of the room – exotic may be the way to go.