Posts Tagged ‘shower floor’

What Kind of Tile Can I Use on My Shower Floor?

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Tile

Shower floors have some special needs. They get wet on a regular basis, which can make them slippery and which may potentially affect some types of soft stone. They also have a special shape which affects the type of flooring you use. When you choose the material for your bathroom floor, be sure to give equal consideration to what goes into the shower.

The biggest consideration you need to make when it comes to your shower floor tile is the size. Your shower floor slopes toward the drain, which means that the tile needs to slope with it. Larger tiles, like those that you may use on the rest of the bathroom floor can crack over time since they can’t conform to the slope.

Therefore, mosaic tiles of 2-inches or smaller are generally necessary for shower floor use. Some installers can make 4-inch tiles slope well, but unless you have seen examples of this, and heard from the homeowners about how it’s holding up a few years later, it’s best to play it safe and use a smaller tile.

Mosaics have another benefit on your shower floor as well. The many grout lines that accompany the tiles help to give the floor some grip, which renders it non-slip, no matter what type of material you choose to use.

Therefore, the only materials you truly need to avoid are things like hand-cut glass, which can cut bare feet, or some very soft limestones that can disintegrate in water. In fact, many people simply choose to use a floor tile that comes in multiple sizes, using the larger size on the bathroom floor itself and the smaller tile in the shower for a sense of continuity in the room. And if you use mosaics on the bathroom floor, consider running them straight into the shower without a curb and make an open shower plan instead. Both of these methods work well in smaller bathrooms because they help to make the floor plan seem larger than it actually is.

When it comes to your shower floor, put the size of the tile first in your considerations, and then look at material and style to get the best fit for the room.