Posts Tagged ‘tile choices’

What Kind of Tile Can I Use on My Shower Floor?

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Tile

Shower floors have some special needs. They get wet on a regular basis, which can make them slippery and which may potentially affect some types of soft stone. They also have a special shape which affects the type of flooring you use. When you choose the material for your bathroom floor, be sure to give equal consideration to what goes into the shower.

The biggest consideration you need to make when it comes to your shower floor tile is the size. Your shower floor slopes toward the drain, which means that the tile needs to slope with it. Larger tiles, like those that you may use on the rest of the bathroom floor can crack over time since they can’t conform to the slope.

Therefore, mosaic tiles of 2-inches or smaller are generally necessary for shower floor use. Some installers can make 4-inch tiles slope well, but unless you have seen examples of this, and heard from the homeowners about how it’s holding up a few years later, it’s best to play it safe and use a smaller tile.

Mosaics have another benefit on your shower floor as well. The many grout lines that accompany the tiles help to give the floor some grip, which renders it non-slip, no matter what type of material you choose to use.

Therefore, the only materials you truly need to avoid are things like hand-cut glass, which can cut bare feet, or some very soft limestones that can disintegrate in water. In fact, many people simply choose to use a floor tile that comes in multiple sizes, using the larger size on the bathroom floor itself and the smaller tile in the shower for a sense of continuity in the room. And if you use mosaics on the bathroom floor, consider running them straight into the shower without a curb and make an open shower plan instead. Both of these methods work well in smaller bathrooms because they help to make the floor plan seem larger than it actually is.

When it comes to your shower floor, put the size of the tile first in your considerations, and then look at material and style to get the best fit for the room.

Flooring Choices for the Powder Room

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Ceramic / Porcelain Tile, Kitchen and Bath, Tile

What really is a modern powder room? This is said to be a small bathroom that has only a toilet and sink installed in it. It is mainly used as convenience for guests and is often strategically situated on the first floor. This is to ensure a space designated for your guests so they don’t have to walk up or down the stairs. Since this space is small, making any choice as far as decorating is concerned is always tough, especially when it has to do with flooring choices for the powder room.

Yes, agreed that this space is small and is just for the guests’ use but you can still make it elegant and welcoming without breaking the bank. When it comes to the flooring of this space, there are several options available which includes but is not limited to the following:

Glass Tile: In using the glass tiles in the flooring of the powder room, it gives the user a spa feeling because of the soothing atmosphere that is created by translucent tiles. You can combine more than one color in these tiles to give the space interest and provide a more custom look.  Use patterns, too!  It’s not only great for a flooring choice, but you can also add detail to the powder room as a backsplash or along the wall.  Check out the photo above to for inspiration for adding this type of detail to this space.  If you would like more information on this trend, please visit our website to learn more about glass tile.

Ceramic Tile: Have you ever considered this option when it comes to flooring choices for the powder room? It’s a great choice because it is durable and if maintained well, can last for many years.  Ceramic is also known to be moisture resistant, which is perfect for bathrooms and powder rooms since they tend to have more moisture in their atmosphere.

Depending on your taste and budget, other choices include but not limited to heated tiles, hardwood, limestone, marble, granite and even vinyl.