Posts Tagged ‘vacuum’

How To Care For Ceramic Tile

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Ceramic / Porcelain Tile

Ceramic tile is a favorite among designers and it has been in use in home design for a very long time. It is popular with home owners because in terms of versatility and design motifs the possibilities seem nearly endless. It can be used in both casual and formal settings and it reign supreme among all surfaces in bathrooms and kitchens. There are two types of ceramic tile – glazed and unglazed and both are set in place with grout. Glazed tile is the shiny tile often seen in bathrooms, and unglazed is the more porous version of the two. Grout is also porous.

Cleaning glazed tile is easily accomplished.  First, make sure to sweep regularly.  This will keep dirt from building up and making clean up more difficult.  You can also use a vacuum without a beater bar or the attachments on the vacuum.  Mats at each entryway will help reduce the amount of dirt tracked in as well. 

Damp mop tile floors regularly as well.  Use a mild detergent and make sure to clean with warm water afterwards to remove any residue from the cleaner.  Be sure to consult the instructions from your manufacturer to ensure any cleaner will not harm your tile.

Don’t use steel wool, abrasive cleaners, or those containing bleach or ammonia.  These can discolor your grout if used too often. 

Tile is amazingly durable, but it can chip or crack under extreme force.  Use floor protectors on furniture legs and chairs and be careful when moving large, heavy items across the floor!

For more information about how to care for your tile, visit us at Century Tile and use this page for reference.  

Best Tools for Dusting

Written by creatingyourspace on . Posted in Care and Maintenance, Hints and Advice, Tips, Uncategorized

17743332_SYou know what dust is made out of, where it comes from and how many times a month you need to dust to keep your home healthy and looking its best. But what are the best tools for getting rid of dust?

Start first with your vacuum. You can use your vacuum to dust your walls, ceilings and baseboards. One downside – if you don’t have a HEPA filter on your vacuum you may end up spewing dust back in the air.

A feather duster is another good tool. Use a feather duster to dust bookshelves without having to move everything off. Just be careful to replace your feather duster if any of the feathers break, as this may cause scratching of surfaces.

A lambs wool duster is also good at getting in small and irregular spaces. This tool tends to stir up less dust than a feather duster, but you do have to make sure to wash it periodically.

Microfiber cloths do a great job of dusting without stirring up dust. The cloths can hold quite a bit of dust and won’t scratch your furniture. They are not great, however, for dusting up high or for dusting irregular surfaces.

Electrostatic cloths are another option. They won’t stir up dust and come in disposable options so that no cleaning in-between dusting is needed. They vary in lengths and sizes and some even come with poles so you can dust up high. The main con to electrostatic dust cloths is that they are more expensive as they are not reusable.

Should you use oils or polishes? Oils and polishes can enhance the look of your wood furniture and they will help with dusting fine surfaces, however, overuse or improper use can cause buildup or cause clouding of your furniture.

Compressed air is the best way to dust electronics. It is also great to use for surfaces where cloths may snag or in small spaces where tools aren’t practical.